ICON & IBM: Transforming Patient Recruitment with IBM Watson

Patient Identification and Clinical Trial Matching

Click here to view Drug Development Costs (PDF)

ICON and IBM are working together on a pilot programme that has the potential to transform clinical trial feasibility, patient recruitment and study start-up timelines by using IBM’s Watson supercomputing system for Clinical Trial Matching to relevant trials.

The pilot program will run for more than six months, based on 25 oncology trials, with participation of patients and investigators at several major US medical centres.

Clinical Trial Matching is an alternative to traditional, manual methods of patient identification and recruitment that includes canvassing sites, advertising and feasibility based on historical data.  

 

Click here to view Patient Recruitment Fast Facts (PDF)

For the first time in the history of clinical trials, ICON will be able to tell sponsors how many patients match their trial criteria, where they are located and how we will recruit them. We will be able to conduct real-time feasibility analyses and model protocol scenarios based on inclusion and exclusion criteria by identifying patients based on medical histories and pre-existing conditions with investigators from research sites.  And with a selection of protocol models available, our team of in-house consultants can predict and advise on the impact of each scenario on clinical trial outcomes.

This will resolve an expensive component in clinical trials that causes 80% of trials to fail on enrolment timelines.  Clinical Trial Matching will reduce delays and associated costs.

Click here to see fast facts around Patient Recruitment.

Click here to see the costs of Drug Development today.

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Drug Development Costs

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References

  1. Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Clinical research charts and statistics. [Accessed August 31 2015]. https://www.ciscrp.org/education-center/charts-and-statistics/before-participation/
     
  2. Cutting Edge Information. Clinical Operations: Benchmarking per-patient trial costs, staffing and adaptive design. [Accessed August 31 2015]. https://www.cuttingedgeinfo.com/2011/clinical-trial-cost-drivers/
     
  3. Cascade E, et al. Conducting research on the internet: Medical record data integration with patient-reported outcomes. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 2012. 14(5):e137.
     
  4. Schüler, Peter, and Buckley, Brendan. Re-engineering Clinical Trials: Best Practices for Streamlining Drug Development. London: Elsevier, 2015. Pp. 7–10.
     
  5. Outsourcing In Drug Development: The Contract CRO Market, 3rd Edition. Kalorama Information, 2008. [Accessed August 31 2015].  http://www.kaloramainformation.com/Outsourcing-Drug-Development-1646604/
     
  6. Fenton L, Rigney M, and Herbst RH. Clinical trial awareness, attitudes, and participation among patients with cancer and oncologists. Journal of Community Oncology. 2009. 6(5): 207-213.

 

Patient Recruitment Fast Facts

Click here to view (PDF)

References

  1. Comis RL, Aldigé CR, Stovall EL, Krebs LU, Risher PJ, Taylor HJ. A quantitative survey of public attitudes towards cancer clinical trials. Philadelphia (PA): Coalition of National Cancer Cooperative Groups, Cancer Research Foundation of America, Cancer Leadership Council and Oncology Nursing Society; 2000. [Accessed August 31 2015]. http://www.cancertrialshelp.org/CTHpdf/308-9.pdf
     
  2. Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Ervik M, Dikshit R, Eser S, Mathers C, Rebelo M, Parkin DM, Forman D, Bray, F. GLOBOCAN 2012 v1.1, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC CancerBase No. 11 Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2014. [Accessed August 31 2015]. http://globocan.iarc.fr/Pages/fact_sheets_cancer.aspx?cancer=all
     
  3. Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program. 2015. National Cancer Institute. [Accessed August 31 2015]. http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/all.html
     
  4. Results for “cancer” on ClinicalTrials.gov. [Accessed August 31 2015]. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=cancer&recr=Recruiting&no_unk=Y&rslt=&type=&cond=&intr=&titles=&outc=&spons=&lead=&id=&state1=&cntry1=&state2=&cntry2=&state3=&cntry3=&locn=&gndr=&rcv_s=&rcv_e=&lup_s=&lup_e=
     
  5. National Cancer Institute. Cancer Clinical Trials: The Basic Workbook. [Accessed August 31 2015]. https://accrualnet.cancer.gov/sites/accrualnet.cancer.gov/files/BasicsWorkbook_m.pdf
     
  6. Murthy VH, Krumholz HM, Gross CP. Participation in cancer clinical trials: race-, sex-, and age-based disparities. JAMA. 2004. 291(22):2720-2726.
     
  7. Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Clinical research charts and statistics. [Accessed August 31 2015]. https://www.ciscrp.org/education-center/charts-and-statistics/before-participation/
     
  8. Schüler, Peter, and Buckley, Brendan. Re-engineering Clinical Trials: Best Practices for Streamlining Drug Development. London: Elsevier, 2015. Pp. 7–10.
     
  9. Fenton L, Rigney M, and Herbst RH. Clinical trial awareness, attitudes, and participation among patients with cancer and oncologists. Journal of Community Oncology. 2009. 6(5): 207-213.